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admin | Greenlight Expediting - Part 3

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What Counts as a Story?

According to New York City’s Building Code, a story is the portion of a building between the “upper surface” of one floor all the way up to the upper surface of the floor above it (or, for the top story, from the upper surface of the floor to the top of ceiling joists or roof rafters).

That being said, it’s not always so simple figuring out what counts as a story and what doesn’t. More Info

Expedited Review for a Certificate of No Effect

Doing any sort of construction work on landmark buildings tends to be a real headache—not only do you have to file permits with the DOB, but with the LPC as well, which can lengthen an already byzantine process.  Thankfully, under certain circumstances, you can apply for what’s known as a “Expedited Review for a Certificate of No Effect,” which can be a big help speeding things up.  In order to be eligible, the proposed work must meet ALL of the following criteria: More Info

The Three Types of Permits Issued by the Landmarks Preservation Commission

The city agency charged with protecting historically, culturally, and architecturally buildings in the city, the Landmarks Preservation Commission, must issue a permit for all construction work done on protected buildings.  There are three basic permits the LPC issues:

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What is revocable consent?

Revocable consent is a right granted by the Department of Transportation (DOT) for a person or business to build and use certain structures on, over or under the city’s streets and sidewalks.  Permission typically lasts for about ten years, albeit with an annual fee.  As the name implies, the city can revoke its consent at any time.

Here’s how to go about applying for it!

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Sidewalk Cafes: What You Need to Know

Few things make a lunch or dinner out more romantic than sitting outside and enjoying the warm summer breeze.  However, because sidewalk cafés are built on city property—namely, the sidewalk—and can present an obstruction to pedestrians, these cafés are subject to special zoning regulations and special government clearance.  According to the New York City Zoning Resolution, there are three main types of sidewalk cafés: More Info

New Fence Requirements

In an attempt to standardize the appearance of temporary protective structures and provide easily accessible information to the public about ongoing projects, the Department of Buildings (DOB) has updated its requirements for both signage and fencing requirements starting July 1, 2013.  Although fencing standards (height, placement, material) are largely the same, there were nonetheless some minor changes worth noting. More Info